Ofsted inspect and regulate to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages

Ofsted….’Children form strong attachments to staff and this helps them feel secure’

Active Kids Nursery HoveOFSTED_good_logo4
8 West Way, Hove, BN3 8LD
Inspection date Previous inspection date

02/04/2014

Not Applicable
The quality and standards of the early years provision This inspection: 2 Previous inspection: Not Applicable How well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children who attend 2 The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children 2 The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years provision 2
The quality and standards of the early years provision:

This provision is good

  • Good arrangements are in place to help children to settle when they first start at the nursery, and to quickly identify and reflect their individual needs in planning.
  • Effective team working and effective self-evaluation results in a service which is continually evolving to more fully reflect the needs of children and their families.
  • Children enjoy playing with the impressive range of resources and use these effectively to enhance their learning and development.
  • Children who speak English as an additional language make good progress. Staff plan activities effectively to ensure they feel included, and promote their understanding of English well.
  • The environment and activities on offer very successfully promote children’s physical development.
  • It is not yet outstanding because
  • The lead roles and responsibilities within the staff team have recently been finalised and are not shared effectively with all staff and parents.
  • Parents receive regular updates on their child’s achievements and progress but staff do not fully engage them in helping to identify future learning goals for their chid.
  • Inspection report: Active Kids Nursery, 02/04/2014 2 of 10
  • Information about this inspection
  • Inspections of registered early years provision are:
  • Scheduled at least once in every inspection cycle – the current cycle ends on 31 July 2016
  • Scheduled more frequently where Ofsted identifies a need to do so, for example where provision was previously judged inadequate
  • Brought forward in the inspection cycle where Ofsted has received information that suggests the provision may not be meeting the legal requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage or where assessment of the provision identifies a need for early inspection
  • Prioritised where we have received information that the provision is not meeting the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage and which suggests children may not be safe
  • Scheduled at the completion of an investigation into failure to comply with the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage.
  • The provision is also registered on the voluntary and compulsory parts of the Childcare Register. This report includes a judgment about compliance with the requirements of that register.
  • Inspection activities
  • The inspector viewed all areas used by the nursery.
  • The inspector spoke with the provider, staff, parents and children at appropriate times during the inspection.
  • The inspector observed the interaction of staff and children during a range of activities.
  • The inspector undertook a joint observation alongside the provider.
  • The inspector viewed a selection of documentation including children’s records and written policies and procedures.

Inspector Liz Caluori

Information about the setting

Active Kids Nursery registered in 2013. It is privately owned and operates from a contained unit within a community building in Hove, East Sussex. There are two group rooms with additional areas for indoor physical play and arts and crafts. There are also three outdoor play areas. The nursery is registered on the Early Years Register and both the compulsory and voluntary parts of the Childcare Register. It opens each weekday from 8am to 6pm all year round. There are currently 24 children on roll, all of whom are in the early years age group. The nursery is able to support children with special educational needs and/or disabilities, as well as those who speak English as an additional language. The nursery receives funding to provide free early education to children aged two, three and four years. There are five staff employed to work with the children, four of whom hold appropriate early years qualifications.

What the setting needs to do to improve further

To further improve the quality of the early years provision the provider should:

  • Offer clearer information about the roles and responsibilities of individual staff, including the newly reviewed key person arrangements
  • Extend further the arrangements to involve parents in their child’s learning by discussing specifically how to help children reach the next steps in their development.

Inspection judgements how well the early years provision meets the needs of the range of children who attend.
Children respond well to staff and enthusiastically join in activities. This is because staff work effectively together to create a friendly, comfortable but very stimulating atmosphere. Staff complete sensitive observations of children to build a picture of their individual interests and abilities. They use these to plan interesting activities which offer a good level of challenge. Effective arrangements are in place to monitor children’s progress and plan the next steps in their learning. Staff understand the importance of regularly exchanging information with parents about their child’s progress. However, there is a tendency for them to focus more on what the child has achieved rather than discussing plans to support their future development. This does not fully encourage parents to take an active role in their child’s learning. There is appropriate provision for completing the required progress checks for children aged two years. Children make good progress in their communication and language. This is particularly apparent in children who speak English as an additional language. Staff use good techniques to help children develop their vocabulary by speaking clearly and naming objects. Children and staff engage in many conversations and children use their rapidly developing language to share their views and ideas, and to ask questions. There are extremely good opportunities for children of all abilities to extend their physical development. There is a lot of space, both inside and outdoors, for young children to practise crawling and walking. Older children have use of a very impressive selection of equipment to promote their general fitness. For example, they very regularly use ride-on vehicles which they steer confidently. They also use climbing equipment, including ropes, to help develop their strength and coordination. Staff very successfully build on children’s existing knowledge and curiosity to extend their language. An example of this includes a gardening activity. Staff teach children how to fill pots with soil, plant seeds, water them and talk about how they need sun to grow. During discussions, children confidently name the different creatures that they are likely to find in a garden. Staff competently contribute additional ideas to increase children’s understanding of the natural world. Good arrangements exist to work with children with special educational needs and/or disabilities. The manager has a good knowledge of the local agencies which are available to provide specialised guidance and support where necessary.

The contribution of the early years provision to the well-being of children
The staff team has only recently been fully formed and, as a result, key person arrangements have only just been assigned and have not all been shared with parents. The role of the key person is, however, fully established. It includes helping key children to settle, monitoring their progress, supporting their individual learning and liaising with their parents. Children form strong attachments to staff and this helps them to feel secure. Staff are very sensitive to children’s emotional wellbeing and are always on hand to offer a reassuring cuddle. Children listen well to their trusted carers and demonstrate extremely good social skills. They are polite, friendly and behave very sensibly. Children take part in experiences which allow them to begin to take some carefully managed risks. These include exploring the challenging rope ladders creatively set out against a grassy bank in one of the outdoor play areas. The nursery environment is bright, clean and well-maintained. The organisation of space is good and children benefit from the freedom they receive to explore the broad range of resources. This encourages them to develop independence in their learning. There is a separate craft area with a well-stocked art trolley for children to visit independently. In addition, the three outdoor areas create inviting play spaces for children. Children receive clear messages about the importance of adopting healthy lifestyles. They enjoy freshly prepared snack and meals which include several portions of fruit and vegetables throughout the day. Staff create menus which are available for parents to see in advance. These reflect individual dietary requirements and colour-coded place mats alert staff to any dietary restrictions when serving food. Staff help children to become independent in their self-care. They teach them to wash their hands before eating and are prompt to offer a tissue or to wipe children’s noses when necessary. Effective arrangements are in place to support children as they move on to school. These include liaising with the schools that they are going to attend to establish relationships with the Reception teachers. In addition staff plan activities such as school-style physical education sessions to help children develop practical skills, such as changing in and out of their clothes.
The effectiveness of the leadership and management of the early years provision
Leadership and management within the nursery is strong. The staff team works extremely well together and all take an active role in shaping the educational programmes for children. As processes and working practices are evolving, all staff meet regularly to monitor their success and to determine areas for further development. They are working closely with advisors from the local authority and have clear action plans in place to prioritise improvements. The manager supports staff through regular one-to-one supervisions and annual appraisals. Within the staff team there is a lot of expertise in relation to child protection, behaviour management and the care of children with special educational needs and/or disabilities. Staff are all aware of the colleagues to refer to for guidance in each of these areas. However, at this time, the manager does not clearly share the finalised details of the designated roles with staff and parents. Robust arrangements are in place to promote children’s safety. The deputy manager takes the lead in safeguarding and child protection. She has an extremely thorough understanding of the procedures to follow should concerns arise regarding the welfare of any child or in case of an allegation against a member of staff. The manager also has rigorous recruitment procedures to check that staff are suitably vetted, qualified and experienced. Staff undertake risk assessments and daily health and safety checks in order to identify and address any potential hazards. This includes identifying areas in the outdoor areas where staff must be deployed to effectively supervise children. The security arrangements are appropriate. The perimeter fencing is in good condition and there is a buzzer entry system to gain entrance to the building. Visitors to the nursery are supervised at all times.
Children benefit from observing the friendly exchanges between their parents and the staff. Parents spoken to during the inspection are very happy with the service they receive and are pleased with the progress their children are making. Effective arrangements are in place to share information with any other childcare settings attended by the children in order to provide coordinated and cohesive care.

The Childcare Register The requirements for the compulsory part of the Childcare Register are met. The requirements for the voluntary part of the Childcare Register are
met.

What inspection judgements mean Registered early years provision Grade Judgement Description
Grade 1
Outstanding
Outstanding provision is highly effective in meeting the needs of all children exceptionally well. This ensures that children are very well prepared for the next stage of their learning.
Grade 2
Good
Good provision is effective in delivering provision that meets the needs of all children well. This ensures children are ready for the next stage of their learning.
Grade 3
Requires improvement
The provision is not giving children a good standard of early years education and/or there are minor breaches of the safeguarding and welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. It will be monitored and inspected within twelve months of the date of this inspection.
Grade 4
Inadequate
Provision that is inadequate requires significant improvement and/or enforcement action. The provision is failing to give children an acceptable standard of early years education and/or is not meeting the safeguarding and welfare requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage. It will be monitored and inspected again within six months of the date of this inspection.

The provision has no children on roll. The inspection judgement is that the provider continues to meet the requirements for registration.
Not met
The provision has no children on roll. The inspection judgement is that the provider does not meet the requirements for registration.

This inspection was carried out by Ofsted under sections 49 and 50 of the Childcare Act 2006 on the quality and standards of provision that is registered on the Early Years Register. The registered person must ensure that this provision complies with the statutory framework for children’s learning, development and care, known as the Early Years Foundation Stage.
Setting details Unique reference number
EY466444 Local authority
Brighton & Hove Inspection number
955439 Type of provision
Full-time provision Registration category
Childcare – Non-Domestic Age range of children
0 – 8 Total number of places
30 Number of children on roll
24 Name of provider
Renata Ghassemi Date of previous inspection
not applicable Telephone number
07795462572
Any complaints about the inspection or the report should be made following the procedures set out in the guidance ‘Complaints procedure: raising concerns and making complaints about Ofsted’, which is available from Ofsted’s website: www.ofsted.gov.uk. If you would like Ofsted to send you a copy of the guidance, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.
Type of provision
For the purposes of this inspection the following definitions apply:
Full-time provision is that which operates for more than three hours. These are usually known as nurseries, nursery schools and pre-schools and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years Register and pay the higher fee for registration.
Sessional provision operates for more than two hours but does not exceed three hours in any one day. These are usually known as pre-schools, kindergartens or nursery schools

and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. They are registered on the Early Years Register and pay the lower fee for registration.
Childminders care for one or more children where individual children attend for a period of more than two hours in any one day. They operate from domestic premises, which are usually the childminder’s own home. They are registered on the Early Years Register and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage.
Out of school provision may be sessional or full-time provision and is delivered before or after school and/or in the summer holidays. They are registered on the Early Years Register and must deliver the Early Years Foundation Stage. Where children receive their Early Years Foundation Stage in school these providers do not have to deliver the learning and development requirements in full but should complement the experiences children receive in school.

The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted) regulates and inspects to achieve excellence in the care of children and young people, and in education and skills for learners of all ages. It regulates and inspects childcare and children’s social care, and inspects the Children and Family Court Advisory Support Service (Cafcass), schools, colleges, initial teacher training, work-based learning and skills training, adult and community learning, and education and training in prisons and other secure establishments. It assesses council children’s services, and inspects services for looked after children, safeguarding and child protection.
If you would like a copy of this document in a different format, such as large print or Braille, please telephone 0300 123 4234, or email enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk.
You may copy all or parts of this document for non-commercial educational purposes, as long as you give details of the source and date of publication and do not alter the information in any way.
To receive regular email alerts about new publications, including survey reports and school inspection reports, please visit our website and go to ‘Subscribe’.
Piccadilly Gate
Store St
Manchester
M1 2WD
T: 0300 123 4234
Textphone: 0161 618 8524
E: enquiries@ofsted.gov.uk
W: www.ofsted.gov.uk
© Crown copyright 2012

Friendly

Our staff’s priority is to provide a friendly atmosphere for both children and parents.

Play Areas

We ensure that play areas are setup each day to reinforce different areas of the EYFS and promote your child’s development.

Qualified

All our staff are fully qualified and trained in every aspect of the EYFS.

Education

We draw from a variety of educational teaching styles including The Montessori Approach, The Waldorf Approach and The Reggio Emilia Approach.

Experienced

When planning our ratios we always ensure that experienced staff members accompany junior ones.

Learning

If Children under the age of 6 years are gently encouraged to learn through interesting games, they pick up skills that will help them maintain an edge through their lives.

Ofsted Graded GOOD